Student Stories: Christine Korme

Christine Korme got got her bachelor’s degree in broadcasting at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York in 1986.
Christine Korme got got her bachelor’s degree in broadcasting at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York in 1986.

Christine Korme is a familiar face to many from her 17 years as a reporter and anchor at TV2. In 2010, she left journalism and is now director of digitalization and renewal at Abelia, a trade and employers association for companies in the knowledge- and technology based sector. Christine has plenty of U.S. experience: She spent five years as TV2’s U.S. correspondent from 1998 to 2003, and got her bachelor’s degree in broadcasting at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York in 1986.  In addition, she has a Master of Management from BI.

Why did you decide to study in the United States?
At that time, in the eighties, the academic programs for TV and radio journalism were generally better in the U.S. than in Norway. Syracuse University’s department of journalism The Newhouse School, had one of the best journalism programs, and still does. I also wanted to go abroad and see the world and get an experience that was different from some of my peers. A third reason was the chance to improve my English language skills

What are your best memories from your time in the U.S?

There are so many! First and foremost, it’s The Newhouse School’s great academic program which was up to date and a solid preparation for entering the world of journalism. But equally, getting to know and understand American culture, mentality and lifestyle. I was invited into so many families’ homes and enjoyed an open minded American hospitality.

“Lånekassen and the student loan system in Norway are simply outstanding!”

What were the biggest challenges during your time there?
During the first few months, I was forced to quickly get up to speed in academic English, especially for my journalism classes. But that went surprisingly fast. As a Norwegian, I figured I would have no problem with those freezing upstate New York winters. But make no mistake, even for a Norwegian, it is cold! However, the great school, lovely campus and excellent academic staff made you forget the wind chill factor which at times swept through not-so-well isolated student dorms.

Syracuse University's department of journalism The Newhouse School, had one of the best journalism programs, and still does.
Syracuse University’s department of journalism The Newhouse School, had one of the best journalism programs, and still does.

Aside from the academic aspect, in what ways would you say that studying in the U.S. has been a benefit to you professionally?
Learning the language well and getting to know the American way of life was very useful for when I many years later returned to the U.S. as foreign correspondent for TV2, living in Washington D.C. After my college years, I felt I had a good understanding of American society, politics and cultural differences. To be exposed to different ways of thinking and living, broadens one’s mind. In an increasingly international corporate world, getting international experience early on is an advantage.

In what way did your time in the U.S. affect you personally?
It gave me at a deeper understanding at a young age that there are many ways one can choose to live one’s life. Also, leaving home at 19 and going to another country where I didn’t know anyone made me independent and able to take care of myself. You simply learn to trust yourself. I would also like to mention that having fellow students who worked their way through college in order to pay their tuition made a lasting impression on me. Lånekassen and the student loan system in Norway are simply outstanding!

Would you recommend other Norwegians to study in U.S.?
Yes, I would recommend students to take a least a year, preferably a full degree, in the States. The quality of the education is great, the general college experience is great, you vastly improve your English skills, and it’s healthy for your outlook on life to have been exposed to different ways of life.  It makes you independent at an early stage. Spend some time picking the right universities for you, and choose an institution with a solid academic record. This is after all more important than where your friends or other Norwegians are going.

More information about education opportunities in the Unites States here.

More USA Student stories here.